Cities have a complex mix of land uses, from commercial districts with dining and shops to residential neighborhoods linked by travel corridors, as well as industrial areas such as ports and factories. All of these different land uses lead to a diversity of urban sources that emit volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and greenhouse gasses such as carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4). Direct measurements and analysis of these species over time helps us understand human interactions with climate and air pollution. 

Carbon dynamics and greenhouse fluxes in a Florida native rangeland. The Science: Grazing lands, including both rangeland and pastureland, cover about 10.7 Mha in Southeastern United States; have a significant impact on the carbon balance in the region. Native rangelands in Florida extend over 3.1 Mha, and about 1.6 Mha of mostly non-forested areas cover… More

Nestled between the mountains of the Olympic Peninsula, hidden behind the raging everlasting Tacoma traffic jam and interrupted-service WA-State ferries, is the Viking town of Poulsbo, WA. And in the outskirts of Poulsbo, in a large hangar, are the towers of Gravitec. I recently spent a week at Gravitec, learning to be a “competent tower… More

It’s not often that you get to see a total solar eclipse from your own back yard. It’s even rarer when your eddy covariance flux site, 300 miles away, is also in the path of totality. That’s just the situation we found ourselves in. On August 21, 2017, a total solar eclipse crossed our research site in the Nebraska SandHills (US-SdH). Being a long-time amateur astronomer, it presented an opportunity that we just couldn’t miss.

To capture the spring release of greenhouse gasses from bog lakes, a team of intrepid UW-Madison researchers installed eddy covariance buoys on two frozen bog lakes in northern Wisconsin in March. These buoys provided under the loaner instrument program (LI-7700) by the AmeriFlux Management Project for the AmeriFlux Year of Methane are continually measuring carbon dioxide and methane fluxes and will continue doing so as ice melts and as the buoys settle into their summer home on the open water.