It’s not often that you get to see a total solar eclipse from your own back yard. It’s even rarer when your eddy covariance flux site, 300 miles away, is also in the path of totality. That’s just the situation we found ourselves in. On August 21, 2017, a total solar eclipse crossed our research site in the Nebraska SandHills (US-SdH). Being a long-time amateur astronomer, it presented an opportunity that we just couldn’t miss.

To capture the spring release of greenhouse gasses from bog lakes, a team of intrepid UW-Madison researchers installed eddy covariance buoys on two frozen bog lakes in northern Wisconsin in March. These buoys provided under the loaner instrument program (LI-7700) by the AmeriFlux Management Project for the AmeriFlux Year of Methane are continually measuring carbon dioxide and methane fluxes and will continue doing so as ice melts and as the buoys settle into their summer home on the open water.

The Science How will forests cope as droughts become more frequent and severe? Piñon-juniper woodlands in the American Southwest are a model system for understanding the effects of drought on trees due to the frequent periods of water stress that characterize this region. Moreover, the dominant tree species in this ecosystem display markedly different drought… More

The AmeriFlux Tech Team has completed another successful site visit season. This year they visited nine AmeriFlux sites. The below gallery features an image from each site visit. The Tech Team is planning for the upcoming site visit season. If you would like to learn more about site visits and what to expect, please see our… More