Ecosystem CO2 exchange and atmosphere boundary layer (ABL) mixing are correlated diurnally and seasonally as they are both driven by solar insulation. Tracer transport models predict that these covariance signals produce a meridional gradient of annual mean CO2 concentration in the marine boundary layer that is half as strong as the signal produced by fossil… More

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Future climate change is expected to affect ecosystem-atmosphere CO2 exchange, particularly through the influence of temperature. To date, however, few studies have shown that differences in the response of net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) to temperature among ecosystems can be explained by differences in the photosynthetic and respiratory processes that compose NEE. Using a new… More

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Significant advances have been made over the past decades in capabilities to simulate diurnal and seasonal variation of leaf-level and canopy-scale photosynthesis in temperate and boreal forests. However, long-term prediction of future forest productivity in a changing climate may be more dependent on how climate and biological anomalies influence extremes in interannual to decadal variability… More

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Three years of meteorological data collected at the WLEF-TV tower were used to drive a revised version of the Simple Biosphere (SiB 2.5) Model. Physiological properties and vegetation phenology were specified from satellite imagery. Simulated fluxes of heat, moisture, and carbon were compared to eddy covariance measurements taken onsite as a means of evaluating model… More

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Ecosystem models often perform poorly in reproducing interannual variability in carbon and water fluxes, resulting in considerable uncertainty when estimating the land-carbon sink. While many aggregated variables (growing season length, seasonal precipitation, or temperature) have been suggested as predictors for interannual variability in carbon fluxes, their explanatory power is limited and uncertainties remain as to… More

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Ecosystem models often perform poorly in reproducing interannual variability in carbon and water fluxes, resulting in considerable uncertainty when estimating the land-carbon sink. While many aggregated variables (growing season length, seasonal precipitation, or temperature) have been suggested as predictors for interannual variability in carbon fluxes, their explanatory power is limited and uncertainties remain as to… More

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The global terrestrial carbon sink offsets one-third of the world’s fossil fuel emissions, but the strength of this sink is highly sensitive to large-scale extreme events. In 2012, the contiguous United States experienced exceptionally warm temperatures and the most severe drought since the Dust Bowl era of the 1930s, resulting in substantial economic damage. It… More

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The global terrestrial carbon sink offsets one-third of the world’s fossil fuel emissions, but the strength of this sink is highly sensitive to large-scale extreme events. In 2012, the contiguous United States experienced exceptionally warm temperatures and the most severe drought since the Dust Bowl era of the 1930s, resulting in substantial economic damage. It… More

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Eddy-covariance measurements are widely used to develop and test parameterizations of land- atmosphere interactions in earth system models. However, a fundamental challenge for model-data comparisons lies in the scale mismatch between the eddy-covariance observations with small (10−1–101 km2) and temporally varying flux footprint, and the continuous regional-scale (102–104 km2) gridded predictions made in simulations. Here,… More

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