Over the past decades, the eddy covariance (EC) community has clearly demonstrated the power of networks; regional networks and FLUXNET have shown us that combining data across multiple sites creates a whole that is greater than the sum of its parts. The FLUXNET database has been used extensively to evaluate satellite measurements, inform Earth system… More

Wetlands are the most important natural source of methane (CH4) to the atmosphere, and there is still considerable uncertainty of CH4 flux and net carbon budgets of wetlands. This uncertainty is due in part to the complex role of wetland vegetation in controlling methane production, oxidation and transport, which challenge the modeling and forecast of… More

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Releases of the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) from thawing permafrost are expected to be among the largest feedbacks to climate from arctic ecosystems. However, the current net carbon (C) balance of terrestrial arctic ecosystems is unknown. Recent studies suggest that these ecosystems are sources, sinks, or approximately in balance at present…. More

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Microbial carbon degradation and methanogenesis in wetland soils generate a large proportion of atmospheric methane, a highly potent greenhouse gas. Despite their potential to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions, knowledge about methane-consuming methanotrophs is often limited to lower-resolution single-gene surveys that fail to capture the taxonomic and metabolic diversity of these microorganisms in soils. Here our… More

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The current paradigm, widely incorporated in soil biogeochemical models, is that microbial methanogenesis can only occur in anoxic habitats. In contrast, here we show clear geochemical and biological evidence for methane production in well-oxygenated soils of a freshwater wetland. A comparison of oxic to anoxic soils reveal up to ten times greater methane production and… More

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