Peatland drainage is an important driver of global soil carbon loss and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Restoration of peatlands by re‐flooding reverses CO2 losses at the cost of increased methane (CH4) emissions, presenting a biogeochemical compromise. While restoring peatlands is a potentially effective method for sequestering carbon, the terms of this compromise are not well… More

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Land use change and management affect climate by altering both the biogeochemical and biophysical interactions between the land and atmosphere. Whereas climate policy often emphasizes the biogeochemical impact of land use change, biophysical impacts, including changes in reflectance, energy partitioning among sensible and latent heat exchange, and surface roughness, can attenuate or enhance biogeochemical effects… More

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Peatlands store substantial amounts of carbon and are vulnerable to climate change. We present a modified version of the Organising Carbon and Hydrology In Dynamic Ecosystems (ORCHIDEE) land surface model for simulating the hydrology, surface energy, and CO2 fluxes of peatlands on daily to annual timescales. The model includes a separate soil tile in each… More

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The vast forests and natural areas of the Pacific Northwest compose one of the most productive ecosystems in the Northern Hemisphere. The heterogeneous landscape of Oregon poses a particular challenge to ecosystem models. This study presents a framework using a scaling factor Bayesian inversion to improve the modeled atmosphere–biosphere exchange of CO2. Observations from five… More

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Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.Degradation of organic carbon stored in permafrost may represent an additional source of atmospheric greenhouse gases (GHGs) in a warming climate. However, there is no clear understanding of how seasonal freeze–thaw affects gas permeability and emission of methane in permafrost soils, in part due to the lack of… More

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Understating the microbial communities and ecological processes that influence their structure in permafrost soils is crucial for predicting the consequences of climate change. In this study we investigated the bacterial and archaeal communities along depth profiles of four soil cores collected across Alaska. The bacterial and archaeal diversity (amplicon sequencing) overall decreased along the soil… More

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Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.Degradation of organic carbon stored in permafrost may represent an additional source of atmospheric greenhouse gases (GHGs) in a warming climate. However, there is no clear understanding of how seasonal freeze–thaw affects gas permeability and emission of methane in permafrost soils, in part due to the lack of… More

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The Pacific Northwest (PNW) region of the United States has some of the most productive forests in the world. As precipitation regimes may shift with changing climate in this area, droughts are predicted to increase in both frequency and degree of severity, which will have a significant impact on already drought-prone ecosystems. When modeling ecosystem… More

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Globally, soil organic matter (SOM) contains more than three times as much carbon as either the atmosphere or terrestrial vegetation. Yet it remains largely unknown why some SOM persists for millennia whereas other SOM decomposes readily—and this limits our ability to predict how soils will respond to climate change. Recent analytical and experimental advances have… More

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