The vast forests and natural areas of the Pacific Northwest compose one of the most productive ecosystems in the Northern Hemisphere. The heterogeneous landscape of Oregon poses a particular challenge to ecosystem models. This study presents a framework using a scaling factor Bayesian inversion to improve the modeled atmosphere–biosphere exchange of CO2. Observations from five… More

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The Pacific Northwest (PNW) region of the United States has some of the most productive forests in the world. As precipitation regimes may shift with changing climate in this area, droughts are predicted to increase in both frequency and degree of severity, which will have a significant impact on already drought-prone ecosystems. When modeling ecosystem… More

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The possibility of global, three-dimensional remote sensing of forest structure with interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) bears on important forest ecological processes, particularly the carbon cycle. InSAR supplements two-dimensional remote sensing with information in the vertical dimension. Its strengths in potential for global coverage complement those of lidar (light detecting and ranging), which has the… More

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Sources and sinks of carbon associated with forests depend strongly on the management regime and spatial patterns in potential productivity. Satellite remote sensing can provide spatially explicit information on land cover, stand-age class, and harvesting. Carbon-cycle process models coupled to regional climate databases can provide information on potential rates of production and related rates of… More

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A new observational approach is presented to approximate the uncertainty (scatter or error variance) in 1-h averaged turbulence fluxes from eddy-covariance measurements. The uncertainty includes potential contributions from instrument problems, heterogeneity and non-stationarity in addition to classical random sampling error. The daytime relative flux uncertainty (RFE) is half as large (20%) at a simple maize… More

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Net ecosystem production (NEP) was estimated over a 10.9 × 104 km2 forested region in western Oregon USA for 2 yr (2002–2003) using a combination of remote sensing, distributed meteorological data, and a carbon cycle model (CFLUX). High spatial resolution satellite data (Landsat, 30 m) provided information on land cover and the disturbance regime. Coarser… More

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Summer drought is a feature of the semi-arid region of central Oregon, USA, where vegetation naturally develops into ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa var. Laws) forest. Forest management consists of clearcut harvest and natural regeneration. Soil microbial activity is interconnected with forest processes because substrate quality and availability can be important driving variables. Stand development influences… More

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To assess the relative influence of edaphoclimatic gradients and stand replacing disturbance on the soil respiration of Oregon forests, we measured annual soil respiration at 36 independent forest plots arranged as three replicates of four age classes in each of three climatically distinct forest types. Annual soil respiration for the year 2001 was computed by… More

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We investigated variation in carbon stock in soils and detritus (forest floor and woody debris) in chronosequences that represent the range of forest types in the US Pacific Northwest. Stands range in age from <13 to >600 years. Soil carbon, to a depth of 100 cm, was highest in coastal Sitka spruce/western hemlock forests (36±10 kg C m−2) and… More

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