Restoring degraded peat soils presents an attractive, but largely untested, climate change mitigation approach. Drained peat soils used for agriculture can be large greenhouse gas sources. By restoring subsided peat soils to managed, impounded wetlands, significant agricultural emissions are avoided, and soil carbon can be sequestered and protected. Here, we synthesize 36 site-years of continuous… More

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Peatland drainage is an important driver of global soil carbon loss and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Restoration of peatlands by re‐flooding reverses CO2 losses at the cost of increased methane (CH4) emissions, presenting a biogeochemical compromise. While restoring peatlands is a potentially effective method for sequestering carbon, the terms of this compromise are not well… More

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Land use change and management affect climate by altering both the biogeochemical and biophysical interactions between the land and atmosphere. Whereas climate policy often emphasizes the biogeochemical impact of land use change, biophysical impacts, including changes in reflectance, energy partitioning among sensible and latent heat exchange, and surface roughness, can attenuate or enhance biogeochemical effects… More

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Water is a limited and valuable resource in California. A large proportion of the fresh water for southern California is supplied by the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers. With recent efforts to restore large areas of land in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta region from farmland to managed wetlands, it is important to investigate the effect… More

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Corrections accounting for air density fluctuations due to heat and water vapour fluxes must be applied to the measurement of eddy-covariance fluxes when using open-path sensors. Experimental tests and ecosystem observations have demonstrated the important role density corrections play in accurately quantifying carbon dioxide ( CO 2 ) fluxes, but less attention has been paid… More

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Wetlands have the ability to accumulate large amounts of carbon (C), and therefore wetland restoration has been proposed as a means of sequestering atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) to help mitigate climate change. There is a growing interest in using the C services of wetlands to help reduce habitat loss and finance restoration projects. However, including… More

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