Aerodynamic canopy height (ha) is the effective height of vegetation canopy for its influence on atmospheric fluxes and is a key parameter of surface‐atmosphere coupling. However, methods to estimate ha from data are limited. This synthesis evaluates the applicability and robustness of the calculation of ha from eddy covariance momentum‐flux data. At 69 forest sites,… More

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Understanding how tropical forest carbon balance will respond to global change requires knowledge of individual heterotrophic and autotrophic respiratory sources, together with factors that control respiratory variability. We measured leaf, live wood, and soil respiration, along with additional environmental factors over a 1-yr period in a Central Amazon terra firme forest. Scaling these fluxes to… More

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The Large-scale Biosphere–Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA) is a multinational, interdisciplinary research program led by Brazil. Ecological studies in LBA focus on how tropical forest conversion, regrowth, and selective logging influence carbon storage, nutrient dynamics, trace gas fluxes, and the prospect for sustainable land use in the Amazon region. Early results from ecological studies within… More

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The usefulness of eddy covariance for understanding terrestrial carbon exchange has been hampered by uncertainty over the magnitude and causes of a systematic underestimation of CO2 efflux on calm nights. We combined in situ measurements of the temperature, wind and CO2 profile with nocturnal Land Surface Temperature (LST) imagery from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission… More

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We used eddy covariance to measure the net exchange of CO2 between the atmosphere and an old-growth tropical forest in Pará, Brazil from 1 July 2000 to 1 July 2001. The mean air temperature and daily temperature range varied little year-round; the rainy season lasted from late December to around July. Daytime CO2 uptake under… More

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We analyzed errors and uncertainties in time-integrated eddy correlation data for sites in the Amazon. A well-known source of potential error in eddy correlation is through possible advective losses of CO2emissions during calm nights. There are also questions related to the treatment of low frequencies, non-horizontal flow, and uncertainties in, e.g., corrections for tube delay… More

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The net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) of a 28–30 m tall transitional (ecotonal) tropical forest of the Brazilian Amazon was quantified using tower-based eddy covariance. Measurements were made between August 1999 and July 2001 and were used to develop nonlinear statistical models to assess daily variations in ecophysiological parameters and provide annual estimates of NEE,… More

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